News

15.07.2020

Snapshot Analysis: "Migrant Workers in the Middle East Facing the Pandemic" (MERGE)

The socio-economic consequences of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic have heavily ravaged lives and livelihoods across the globe, with more than 12 million confirmed cases worldwide. The pandemic has particularly unmasked the vulnerabilities of disadvantaged communities. Among them are millions of migrant workers in the Middle East who are reeling from the economic slowdown.

With three different opinion pieces on this compilation, the MERGE network puts a spotlight on how migrant workers in the region have been impacted by both the pandemic itself and the measures that came with it. The premise of the compilation is, in addition to providing academic insights, to engage with experts and activists possessing substantive knowledge about the issue.

Find the full dossier here:
Snapshot Analysis "Migrant Workers in the Middle East Facing the Pandemic" [pdf]

26.05.2020

Survey on Syrian-German Identities

Survey on Syrian-German Identities

Many Syrians have found a new home in Germany after having lived here for years.

We are interested to learn how both the German and Syrian cultures play a role in your daily life, interact with each other, complement each other or are in conflict with each other as the case may be.

Is it possible to feel Syrian and German at the same time? Please share your opinion with us! This survey is directed at Syrians who have lived in Germany since 2015 or longer. To participate you must be at least 18 years old. And kindly share our survey in your networks.

The survey takes about 15-20 minutes to complete:
https://umfrage.hu-berlin.de/index.php/973633?lang=en (English)
https://umfrage.hu-berlin.de/index.php/973633?lang=ar (Arabisch)


We look forward to learning from your experiences!
 

+++استطلاع عن الهوية الثقافية السورية-الألمانية +++


عاش الكثير من السوريين في المانيا في السنين الماضية و وجدوا فيها وطناً جديداً.

نحن مهتمون بدراسة  دور الثقافتين السورية والألمانية في حياتك اليومية، وكيف تتكاملان أو تتعارضان مع بعضهما البعض.
هل من الممكن أن تشعر بأنك سوري/ة والماني/ة في آن واحد؟ شارك برأيك معنا! للمشاركة يجب أن تكون سورياً. و لابد أن يكون عمرك 18 عامًا أو أكثر ويجب أن تكون مقيما في ألمانيا منذ 2015 أو قبل ذلك.
ويرجى مشاركة هذا الاستطلاع مع دائرتك الاجتماعية.



سيستغرق هذا الاستطلاع حوالي 15 إلى 20 دقيقة.

https://umfrage.hu-berlin.de/index.php/973633?lang=ar (عربى)
https://umfrage.hu-berlin.de/index.php/973633?lang=en (الإنجليزية)


نتطلع إلى التعلم من خبراتك!

18.05.2020

Snapshot Analyses on the 'Refugee Deal' - Four Years After the EU-Turkey Statement (MERGE)

MERGE is a collaborative research network, bringing together scholars in migration studies and other knowledge-holders with a focus on the Middle East to provide a comprehensive understanding of the regimes of mobility in the region. It is based at the Berlin Institute for Empirical Research on Integration and Migration (BIM) at Humboldt University, Berlin.

With this dossier, the MERGE network presents different snapshot analyses and future scenarios regarding the EU-Turkey Statement, which was signed four years ago on March 18, 2016, to address the Syrian refugee issue. The Statement has immensely impacted the lives of millions of refugees, as well as Turkey - a main hosting/transiting country - and Greece as the main entry point into the EU. Political uncertainties between Brussels and Ankara persist regarding the future of the agreement in the wake of Ankara’s manoeuvre in late February to decrease its border control toward irregular crossings into Greece.
This dossier also intends to be a reminder of the current situation amidst Covid-19, and the cynicism of #stayhome campaigns while many migrants are homeless and unable to quarantine themselves.

Find the full dossier here:
Snapshot Analyses on the "Refugee Deal": Four Years After the EU-Turkey Statement [pdf]

16.04.2020

"Refugees Are Part of Our Future"

Dr. Begüm Başdaş is a geographer, human rights defender and Einstein Fellow at BIM at Humboldt Universität. Here she talks about her research with Afghan refugees in Greece, the situation of the camps in Lesvos island, the EU-Turkey Deal and the current threats of coronavirus. • Interview by Wolfgang Farkas


Dr. Başdaş, unfortunately, we can’t meet personally for this interview. But we can try on the telephone – from desk to desk. Since you’ve finished the first half of your Einstein Fellowship, before we talk about the situation of the refugees on the Greek islands – I’d like to ask you about your current project? What research are you conducting?

Begüm Başdaş: My proposed project is about the politics of solidarity and refugee care, with a focus on Afghan men in Greece and Berlin. The title is »Masculinities on the Move: Spatial Politics of Solidarity and Care Among Refugees in Germany and Greece«. I did participatory research and conducted 15 interviews in Greece this past summer.

What made you curious about researching masculinity in this context?

As a feminist geographer my work has always focused on gender and sexuality in the past, so this has remained my main topic of interest in migration studies. When people talk about gender, people usually understand gender studies as »women studies«. But this is not true obviously. We must also consider the experiences of men and the violence they face in these environments, simply just because they’re men.

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»When people talk about gender, people usually understand gender studies as women studies. But this is not true obviously. We must also consider the experiences of men and the violence they face in these environments, simply just because they’re men.«
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When we look at the data in Europe and in Greece in particular, Afghans are the largest group of refugees and asylum seekers after Syrians in the last few years. Since 2000, with the war in Afghanistan, most of the Afghans that arrived in Europe have been single young men and minors under 18. Refugee men, especially single young men in Europe face discrimination and are stigmatized, because they are perceived as a threat to society. Afghan men also face the highest number of deportations from Europe. Many Afghans are sent back to Afghanistan, as many countries in Europe define Kabul as a safe place.

While there is plenty of research on Syrians and women refugees, Afghan men are made invisible in migration and gender studies. I therefore really wanted to focus on Afghan men to understand how they reconstruct their identities as they move through borders. I conducted about fifteen individual semi-structured interviews with Afghan men this past summer on the Greek island of Lesvos. I tried to understand their experiences en route, and how they are shaped by both the feeling of being in transit and being stuck on an island.

Your main place of research has been Lesvos so far – so how did you meet the young Afghan men?

When you look at Moria Camp in Lesvos, it is like a little Afghanistan. 

70 percent of the population in Moria is from Afghanistan at the moment – not only Afghan men of course. There are also a lot of women, children and families. Thus, they are in a way forced to carry on with many of the embodied traditions and cultural norms in the camps. At the same time, for the first time in their lives, they are engaging or seeing people from across Europe who are either working in the camps or other humanitarian centers, Greeks in the city or mere tourists. Lesvos is their first moment of contact with Europe.

Where did you meet them and talk to them?

In different places. Some would be around the Moria camp and others in the city center.

Do you know the island very well?

Yes, I’ve been working on and off in Lesvos for six years now. I started going to Lesvos and got involved in solidarity networks when I was working for Amnesty International Turkey as the campaigns and activism coordinator. I was primarily responsible for refugee rights in Europe.

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»The common belief is that some university professor will write something that nobody will ever really read or need and thus it will have no impact.«
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The main problem is that academic research isn’t seen as relevant in these contexts. Since 2015, many academic researchers have been working in »crisis« locations like Lesvos. The common belief is that some university professor will write something that nobody will ever really read or need and thus it will have no impact. Hotspots are challenging places for a variety of reasons especially because people are always firefighting. Everyday there is an emergency. In the midst of all of this, people have little time to sit and reflect on their experiences, and even less for a short interview.

When I’d interview an asylum seeker from Moria camp, this meant he would miss a meal, as it takes a few hours in line to get food. They would usually get held up with something and we would have to reschedule many times. When I met with them in the city, I offered them bus tickets and, depending on the time of the day, I offered lunch, coffee or dinner. I wanted to make sure that I am not an extra burden on them. In almost all interviews, the person I spoke to would take 15 minutes to explain himself and apologize about not being able to pick up the check. It was indeed hard for them to accept that I, as a woman (also a woman from Turkey makes a difference), paid for their food or drinks. It is those moments where you keep rethinking how to create the best settings for the interviews.

They don’t expect positive results from the academic interviews and projects, do they?

No, they don’t. Especially since 2015, there has been an overflow of academic interest in these locations. Refugees or other people working on the islands don’t see any change happening in their lives. Academic work has no immediate impact in the lives of people on the islands. Academic knowledge is important, of course, but for them it’s different because they do not see the direct effect of the work we do on the ground. I think, as academics, we really must reconsider how we do research and the ways in which we produce knowledge. I believe it must be much more participatory. These are some of my methodological questions and, for this reason, I also volunteered in one of the camps during my research.

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»I think, as academics, we really must reconsider how we do research and the ways in which we produce knowledge. I believe it must be much more participatory. These are some of my methodological questions and, for this reason, I also volunteered in one of the camps during my research.«
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Could you describe what these camps are like – and what did you volunteer to do?

On the Lesvos island, there are three camps for asylum seekers: Moria, Karatepe and Pikpa.
We all know Moria. Karatepe is a much smaller camp mainly organized by UNHCR and city officials. Pikpa camp is organized by a voluntary organization called Lesvos Solidarity, which has been providing support to refugees since long before 2015. Lesvos Solidarity also works through a long history of migration as many residents of Lesvos were once refugees from Anatolia – I mean their parents and grandparents. I know and worked with the Pikpa team for many years now. Pikpa camp hosts about 85 people who are the most vulnerable. It has no connection to state authorities and organized completely by volunteers. It is a very small space with limited capacity, so the number of residents is very low. I volunteered for Lesvos Solidarity and worked at the camp regularly. I did not do interviews with residents of Pikpa.

You separated this?

It’s not necessarily a separation. In participatory research as your methodology, your daily life becomes a part of the research. You’re with people. Every day when I returned from Pikpa, I would take notes about what I saw, what I experienced, and how I felt. I did not want to make people feel like they were the objects of my research. On Tuesdays, I worked at the kiosk and distributed toilet paper, shampoo, soap, and things like that. I had the chance to talk to more than half of the residents about their everyday lives. I never directly asked questions. I went along with the narratives they picked for the day. I’m extensively trained on ethics in the field. But they might not be aware of this or feel safe enough to trust me. Such issues of ethics in fieldwork must be recognized and negotiated on a daily basis. When they asked me about my academic work, I was always honest and open about it.

What have you discovered about the cultural norms of the young Afghan men so far?

This is a bigger discussion and I think I am still learning. Afghanistan is not a monoculture and includes many different ethnic and religious identities such as Pashtuns, Hazaras, Tajiks, Uzbeks and many others. There are also different languages like Pashto and Dari. In Europe, we speak of Afghanistan very generally without really knowing these differences and the histories of violence they embody. Therefore, experiences of gender and sexuality also differ among men from Afghanistan. Though it is safe to say that Afghanistan is overall a very patriarchal society and male dominated. When these men leave Afghanistan, they do not leave these cultural norms back at home or at the borders. They carry their values on gender and family with them most the time and struggle with it. But one of the reasons I was keen on working with young Afghan men is that I always thought and observed that their experiences were somehow different from men from other countries in the region, say Syrians or Iraqis – this is still very hard for me to explain.

The difference also comes from the fact that there are a lot of single young Afghan men traveling alone without their families. This is sometimes a burden for them, but it also allows them to meet many different people on the road. Each narrative is unique.

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»The difference also comes from the fact that there are a lot of single young Afghan men traveling alone without their families. This is sometimes a burden for them, but it also allows them to meet many different people on the road. Each narrative is unique.«
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As they’ve been on the road, they find themselves at a crossroads in their life. So this is a very special point in their life regarding their identity?

Many young Afghan men hang out with European volunteers and spend a lot of time with them. Some are even involved in romantic and intimate relations. Through these encounters they are confronted with new aspects of their identities. They can sometimes be emotionally challenging or very empowering moments. But my comments should not be understood to mean that when Afghan men meet »the new«, they change for better or worse. That approach risks further stigmatization of refugee men and their cultures. I am merely looking at how they change.

For example, when we talk about LGBTI asylum seekers from the Middle East, we see how they can be criminalized in their home countries. While we want to ensure protection for them in the EU, we should not instigate Islamophobia. While we do research on marginalized groups and advocate for their rights, we must be very careful to control where that discourse may take us.

In what sense is LGBTI – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Identities – a topic for you in this project?

My research is not focused on LGBTI groups, though to my own embarrassment, after conducting the fieldwork, I realized that at times I was also biased and did not really push any boundaries on sexual orientation. As a long time LGBTI rights activist in Turkey, I got very upset with myself, frankly speaking, because I was also sucked into the dominant patriarchal, heterosexist norms they embraced themselves with. All the men I talked to seemed to talk about their experiences as heterosexual men – of course not using these exact words but talking about being attracted to women. I never pushed these limits in the dialogues.

This also tells us something about the asylum processes and solidarity networks in places like Lesvos. There are very few volunteers who are able to support LGBTI refugees in the islands. There is no proper official organization that focuses on LGBTI rights extensively. There are no proper reach-out programs in the camps. The camps are also similar to where refugees come from, in terms of how bodies are monitored and controlled through norms. LGBTI people are very afraid to reveal their identities during their stay in the camp. As UNHCR and other protection institutions do not provide public data, we do not know how many people seek asylum on the basis of sexual orientation. Amid all the challenges the camps present, LGBTI people are pushed to the lower layers of vulnerability and no one really talks about them. I was upset because I am sure there are many LGBTI people in the camps. We just do not know about them and I could not be self-reflexive enough to see that in the field. At Pikpa camp, there were residents who identified as gay and trans, but even at Pikpa camp it was not easy for them to come out openly.

Moreover, if we look at the asylum application processes, we see vital problems, because there is no common asylum law even in one single country. One gay man I know from Syria was resettled in Amsterdam as a refugee. He is back at university and very happy there. However, from my work at Amnesty, I have also witnessed many rejections and deportations of Afghan gay men who sought asylum. There is no coherent protection program for LGBTI asylum seekers in Europe.

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»Most asylum seekers in the camps are scared to reveal their identities. They might be ashamed as well if they do not have the tools to recognize their own identities or rights.«
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And at the same time, the refugees themselves are ashamed to talk about it.

Most asylum seekers in the camps are scared to reveal their identities. They might be ashamed as well if they do not have the tools to recognize their own identities or rights. This is very understandable. But most of all, in places like Moria camp, survival is of utmost priority, because their lives are at imminent risk. They do not have access to health care, asylum process, food, or shelter. None of the basic rights are available to them in daily life. They pick the battle to survive first. That does not mean their sexualities are erased or that they have no desires. No, many things are going on, but they are made invisible and not politicized.

Under such circumstances, would you talk about being gay and not being able to express your identity or would you immediately talk about not having enough food? Of course, you’re going to first talk about food. Of course, you’re first going to say that you have no place to sleep.

What was the situation like the last time you were there – in summer 2019?

That summer, when the arrivals started to increase, people were not given any tents and there were no shelter spaces left. Capacity at Moria is 3000 and in the summer, there were already 19,000 people living there. There weren’t even any tents for the new arrivals. Only blankets were given to many of them, especially to single people arriving. They would spend the nights rolled inside the blanket for many days.

People come to Greece with already established traumas from war or persecution. When they are forced to live in these environments, new traumas are added to their experiences. However, none of that gets recognized in their asylum applications. People escape from war in Syria or Afghanistan, but they are facing another kind of war inside the EU territories.

What do you know about the actual situation? In the more critical articles, it is said that especially Moria has become of one of the shameful symbols of the failure of asylum politics of the EU. What do you think is the most important thing about the situation in Moria now? How would you judge it?

Moria camp was a military facility turned into a reception center after the »crisis«. It has a maximum capacity to host around 3,000 people, but now there are about 20,000 people, and the olive grove surrounding the camp is also filled with tents and makeshift shelters. Refugees call this area the »jungle«. As many newspapers and reporters wrote before, asylum seekers define Moria as »hell«, »worse than Afghanistan«, some asylum seekers I spoke with say.

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»Refugees call this area the jungle. As many newspapers and reporters wrote before, asylum seekers define Moria as hell, worse than Afghanistan, some asylum seekers I spoke with say.«
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Inside Moria, there is a health clinic that has couple of doctors for the entire camp area. There is no proper food distribution. People wait about 2 hours for each meal and the food is not even edible. There are no proper toilettes, mainly portable ones and there is one for each 200 people or so. There is limited access to clean water, let alone hot water. Shower areas are also extremely limited, usually with broken doors and there is no safety or privacy. Especially at night everyone is scared to use the toilet, but especially women and children. Overall, the camps are dangerous places as many fights also occur among the residents. Some voluntary organizations or refugees try to organize classes to teach language or basic skills, but they are always temporary. Therefore, they do not have access to education either. The list can go on for pages and pages. In summary, there is no access to any of the basic needs of the people. Now it is even worse due to recent circumstances.

There is no real garbage collection. When you visit the camp area, you see mountains of trash and plastic everywhere risking the health of the residents. There are hundreds of people already with pre-existing serious health conditions. In the days of corona, focus has been put on access to health care, but it has been many months since human rights defenders and other NGOs like MSF have called on authorities to warn them about potential infectious diseases in the camps, due to lack of hygiene. People have been stuck in this situation for a long time now, and their lives have been put at risk in Moria due to the EU-Turkey Deal.

The EU-Turkey Deal – you’ll have to explain this, please.

In 2015, as the numbers of arrivals in Italy and Greece towards northern countries started to increase, the EU decided to take a number of measures to strengthen both its internal and external borders. The summer of 2015 and the arrival of refugees initially created a sense of solidarity across Europe. Germany played an important role to welcome thousands of refugees. This welcoming approach did not last very long, as it stirred a lot of anti-refugee movements. For the EU, external borders were always paramount, and many human rights organizations defined it as »Fortress Europe«. However, these proved to be not enough to stop migration. Quickly, internal borders such as the Croatian-Hungarian-Austrian borders within the EU were closed; and to further strengthen the external borders, the EU started to make deals with third countries like Libya and Turkey by way of externalization of migration.

Since the start of the war in Syria, people escaping the war first came to Turkey and then tried to reach the northern European countries through Greek borders, because Turkey retains a geographical limitation to the Geneva Convention. There are no sustainable solutions for them in Turkey. The EU made a deal with Turkey to »hold« the refugees in its territories and control irregular migration though land and sea borders. There are a number of promises in this deal to comfort Turkey – such as visa reforms, EU accession process and a large sum of funding to support refugees in the country. There were also outrageous elements in the deal, for example, for every Syrian returned to Turkey, the EU promised to resettle another Syrian to Europe. Almost none of these aspects of the deal worked, although Turkey did curb a large number of refugees crossing the borders by effective pull-backs. The Greek side in this deal was asked to keep the arrivals in the five hotspot islands until their asylum processes were completed – which resulted in the increased numbers of asylum seekers held at reception camps like Moria, Vathy and Vial. The EU-Turkey deal is neither an agreement nor a convention. It is simply a statement and is has no force of international law. This is the most interesting part of the EU-Turkey deal, as it depends on the »good will« of the parties involved.

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»The EU-Turkey deal is neither an agreement nor a convention. It is simply a statement and is has no force of international law. This is the most interesting part of the EU-Turkey deal, as it depends on the good will of the parties involved.«
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Human rights organizations have been against it all along. Today, Turkey is protesting it by opening its borders, and Greece is demanding amendments to the deal.

What is the function of the so-called Hotspots?

Hotspots exist in the Mediterranean as well, but at the Greece-Turkey sea borders, it is five North Aegean islands: Lesvos, Chios, Samos, Kos and Leros islands. According to the EU-Turkey deal, Greece is required to keep all arrivals on the islands until their asylum application process is completed. Those who are rejected can be returned to Turkey only if they are on the islands. The ones who are moved to the mainland cannot be returned to Turkey according to the deal. Currently, there are around 40,000 asylum seekers in all five islands and all of them are way beyond their capacity.

What is the migration policy of the new Greek government?

In July 2019, there was a national election in Greece, and the conservative New Democracy party (ND) led by Mitsotakis won the majority vote. Golden Dawn, the extreme right-wing party, could not get a seat in parliament this time, but most of their anti-migrant rhetoric was already in the election campaign of New Democracy that claimed it can fix the economy and control migration. Greek people are not overwhelmingly anti-migrant actually, but they were fed up with the austerity measures and EU completely leaving Greece alone on migration issues. We do not have time to expound on this here, but when you look at the recent history of migration and economy in Greece, voting for ND does not make any sense, but they did.

New Democracy’s main argument is to control migration by strengthening the borders, border security is equaled with national security – making migration a security concern. As soon as ND came into power, it initiated a number of actions to strengthen borders and change the asylum law to speed up the return of asylum seekers to Turkey. Greek authorities believe more than half of asylum seekers in Greece are just economic migrants and therefore do not have the right to international protection, such as Afghans. The new law that took force on January 1, speeds up the asylum applications by skipping some steps in the processes and limits access to translators. Basically, the new law violates each asylum seeker’s right to individualized, effective and fair access to asylum application procedures. Before the corona outbreak, Greece claimed that it would return at least 10,000 asylum seekers back to Turkey. We’ll see how that goes. I think currently Turkey is not accepting returns due to coronavirus.

Their second main proposal was to build closed camps to hold asylum seekers during their application process. Initially, they claimed these would be completely closed, then they changed their rhetoric and claimed these camps would allow »controlled« entry and exit. No one knows what that means, but acknowledging the challenges of Greek bureaucracy, these places will become detention centers.

In November when the government announced the plans for closed camps on the islands, the people on the islands – Greek locals – rejected the proposals and wanted the islands to be decongested. They want asylum seekers to be transferred out of the islands. They started protests claiming, »we want our islands and our lives back«. New Democracy, to push the construction of the camps in Lesvos and Chios, sent hundreds of riot police with army vehicles and machinery to the islands. That instigated clashes between the locals and the riot police for several days in late February 2020 when the police used excessive violence, tear gas and water cannons against its own citizens, who were protesting the constructions. Finally, Athens was forced to pull back the riot police and restart negotiations. I think they did not expect such a strong and persistent resistance from the locals. 

Were these demonstrations organized by the locals successful?

… for a moment, yes. At least the locals felt that way. However immediately after these events on February 28, the President of Turkey announced that it would open its borders to Europe, and it would no longer stop refugees from leaving. This started a whole new ordeal to justify all the actions of the Greek government and motivated the anti-migrant groups to disseminate their hate rhetoric and attack people on the islands.

The closed camp clashes, the corona outbreak and Turkey opening its borders, all merged in one moment and resulted in the increased human rights violations against refugees on both sides of the borders.

Right before the emergence of corona and Turkey opening its borders, Mitsotakis spoke to the public to persuade people about the necessity of the closed camps and established a relation between corona and migration. He basically said that increased border security and closed camps are a necessity to stop corona from entering Greece. Of course, the first cases of corona in Greece had nothing to do with refugees. However, he presented refugees as biological weapons, who would come and infect all Greeks. This fear is still strong in Greece and once the restrictions due to corona are lifted, I worry a lot about the policies that will be implemented about refugees.

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»Of course, the first cases of corona in Greece had nothing to do with refugees. However, he presented refugees as biological weapons, who would come and infect all Greeks.«
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When Erdogan claimed to open the borders, some Greeks started to write »corona is coming« in social media. The evil spirit between Turkish and Greek borders has a history much beyond the limits of our discussion, but Greeks (not all of course but the general public) united under the claim »Greece Under Attack« and »I stand with Greece« when Erdoğan opened the borders.

During these days, both on land and at the sea borders, we saw a huge increase in anti-migrant groups attacking refugees, journalists, and volunteers working in NGOs in solidarity with the refugees. Many volunteers and journalists had to leave the islands to protect themselves. There was also confirmed news that some members of the international neo-Nazi groups from Austria and Germany arriving in Lesvos to support anti-migrant groups, though they disguised themselves as journalists.

The Greek government was long trying to reduce the presence of NGOs and humanitarian groups in the camps through new legal changes. However, with the corona outbreak they did not even need new laws and ordered all the humanitarian organizations to leave the camps for health reasons. Some of the government staff and a limited group of NGOs are still there, but even before the outbreak, there was not enough support.

What does the threat of Corona mean for the people in the camps now?

The Migration Minister Mitarakis rephrases »stay home« and orders camp residents to »stay in camps«. Several weeks ago, the government »closed« the camp areas. Camps like Moria with their surroundings are not places where you can lock down, as they do not have proper entrance points, so this rule means more policing of the camps.

Asylum seekers are not even allowed to walk around the camp area. They are forced to remain within the camp – if possible, in tents – with 20,000 people in Moria. Last week, a police car patrolling outside the camp made announcements from speakers to remind the refugees to keep physical distance. Sounds like the worst joke ever. There is no space, regular water or electricity in the camps. In containers that are made to house 6-7 people, there are at least 20 people. They have to wait in long lines for food or to use the toilet. Therefore, I do not know how people can keep physical distance as ordered.

The Greek authorities claim that they are making medical facilities in hotspot camps, but in the case of an outbreak there is no way these spaces would suffice to deal with the situation. They are also handing out brochures to asylum seekers in multiple languages on how to protect themselves. The camps are becoming more and more like a black box. For example, lawyers in the islands do not have much access to detention centers in the camp.

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»In Moria camp, refugees are also organizing themselves and using whatever tools they have to try to protect themselves against the virus. A small group of refugees formed a workshop with the guidance of an Afghan pharmacist, and they are sewing face masks from whatever clothes they find.«
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In Moria camp, refugees are also organizing themselves and using whatever tools they have to try to protect themselves against the virus. A small group of refugees formed a workshop with the guidance of an Afghan pharmacist, and they are sewing face masks from whatever clothes they find. They are left to their own devices, but this is not new. They are doing their best to stay alive.

There are now two camps in the Greek mainland close to Athens – Ritsona and Malakas camps – with asylum seekers, who tested positive for Covid-19. Last week the total number was 28 asylum seekers. The government put these camps under quarantine. We do not know exactly what the conditions are or what additional measures are being taken in these camps. The government policy is to close these camps, so that there is no risk of infecting the general public, but it seems like they do not care about what happens inside the camps.

After Turkey claimed it will allow refugees to exit its borders, the Greek Prime Minister announced that as of March 1 they will suspend asylum applications and anyone who enters Greece »illegally« will be returned to their countries of origin. This decision was both the violation of the Geneva Convention and the non-refoulement principle. On April 1, this decision was reversed, and it was noted that the applications of people who entered in March will also be accepted. However, at the moment, all asylum application processes have been slowed down or stopped in Greece due to the coronavirus. The arrivals are given a document to apply to the asylum office, but that office is closed until at least May 15.

Also, the government has assured the public that any new arrivals on the islands will not be taken to the camps and will be kept in isolation. Some of the arrivals were taken to the mainland, to the Malakas and Serres camps, but there are still a couple of hundred people in Lesvos and, for them, the isolation is more like a detention in an open outdoor space without access to shelter or food.

I am pointing out the problems that exist with the Greek authorities, but surely the EU authorities must also be held responsible. Even if Greece wanted to do the right thing, they do not have the resources. When it comes to protecting the borders, the EU is ever-present. When it is about protecting the most vulnerable, the EU has been absent. With the presence of the coronavirus, not only external but also internal borders of EU have been closed to a certain extent and many EU countries have suspended the resettlement process.

EU Commissioner Johansson has been trying to persuade EU member countries to take responsibility, especially as regards the resettlement of 1,500 unaccompanied minors in Greek camps. It seems like ten countries have said yes, but since the coronavirus outbreak, it has become almost impossible. This week, it is expected that about 12 children will be moved to Luxembourg and some to Germany. Evacuation of all camps under the current circumstances is not easy, but as many health experts in Germany argue, there might be ways to transfer unaccompanied minors.

………………………………………………………………

»What the EU does not understand is that, by denying refugees and asylum seekers their basic human rights and access to their economic, social and cultural rights, they are denying the future of Europe. This is a simple fact. The coronavirus once again has shown us how fragile the EU is. And most importantly, refugees are part of our future and they must be part of the solution. «
………………………………………………………………

What the EU does not understand is that, by denying refugees and asylum seekers their basic human rights and access to their economic, social and cultural rights, they are denying the future of Europe. This is a simple fact. The coronavirus once again has shown us how fragile the EU is. And most importantly, refugees are part of our future and they must be part of the solution.

There are good examples too. Portugal decided to treat all asylum seekers with pending applications as permanent residents at least until the summer to ensure their access to health care.

Coming back to your own perspectives and to your research project, what’s next?

This spring I was planning to reach out to Afghans in Berlin and see if I could also do further fieldwork here. This is impossible at the moment. I am currently staying home and monitoring the islands from here. I follow the developments in Greece daily, but I am not sure if I will be able to return this summer to continue my research on the islands. Greece rightfully has closed its borders to travelers like any other place. I must add that it is not possible or humane to continue »business as usual« under the circumstances we are living in. Under these circumstances, I would be open to revise my research questions and find alternative ways to continue my work. Right now, I am doing my best to analyze my findings from the past summer and closely follow the situation of refugees in Greece.

………………………………………………………………

ABOUT

Begüm Başdaş defines herself as a feminist cultural geographer. She comes to the table with a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds. She has a BA in Sociology, an MA in Urban and Architectural History, and a PhD in Geography. Her methodology and theoretical framework are highly influenced from queer theorists like Laurent Berlant, Jack Halberstam, Jose Esteban Munoz, Sara Ahmed and Judith Butler. While she has continued to teach in these fields after graduate school, she also worked full time for Amnesty International as a campaigner on human rights. Currently, she is an Einstein Fellow at BIM at Humboldt University. One of her many ambitions is to bring academia and activism together in theory and practice. It is crucial that her academic work pushes boundaries and challenges the ways we engage with the world.

If you have any questions, you can contact Begüm Başdaş: bbasdas@icloud.com

To support refugee right activists, Begüm Başdaş recommends making donations to Lesvos Solidarity: lesvossolidarity.org

Wolfgang Farkas is a journalist and author and works as a free editorial associate at Berlin Institute for empirical Integration and Migration Research (BIM).

Contact: wf@bookrider.de

Proofreading: Veronica Trespalacios

22.08.2019

Vacancies at the BIM

Research fellow
with presumably full-time employment E 13 TV-L HU (third party funding, fixed-term until 30.06.2022)


Kennziffer
DR/139/19

Kategorie(n)
Wissenschaftliches Personal

Anzahl der Stellen
1

Einsatzort
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM)

Bewerbung bis
12.09.19

Job description:
Scientific services in research within the project “Migration and the welfare state – migration models, fiscal effects, acceptance and institutional adaptability” with close alignment with the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration and particular focus on the theoretical development and empirical test of generational accounting and dynamic equilibrium models in order to estimate the long term expected fiscal effects of immigration; quantitative data analysis; publication of research results in peer-reviewed international journals; presentation of results for expert audiences as well as broader public audiences; project management tasks: budget administration, event organization, public relations tasks;  tasks pertaining to scientific qualification (PhD)

Requirements:
Completed academic education in Economics preferably with a specialization in the field of Public Finance or related subfields; advanced quantitative data analysis skills as well as experience with common statistical analysis packages (e. g. Stata, R); well-grounded knowledge in Integration and Migration Research (especially labour market integration); expertise about the theoretical and empirical modelling within the frameworks of generational accounting and dynamic equilibrium models would be highly advantageous; experience in the management and administration of research projects is desired; excellent language skills in German and English

Bewerbung an
Please send your application within 3 weeks, and quoting the reference number DR/139/19, to: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM), Dr. Tim Müller, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany or preferably by e-mail in a single PDF-file to t.mueller@hu-berlin.de. We are kindly asking to not send photographs with your CV.
HU is seeking to increase the proportion of women in research and teaching, and specifically encourages qualified female scholars to apply. Severely disabled applicants with equivalent qualifications will be given preferential consideration. People with an immigration background are specifically encouraged to apply. Since we will not return your documents, please submit copies in the application only.
Please visit our website www.hu-berlin.de/stellenangebote, which gives you access to the legally binding German version.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Research fellow
with presumably 2/3-part-time employment - E 13 TV-L HU (third party funding, fixed-term until 30.06.2022)


Kennziffer
DR/140/19

Kategorie(n)
Wissenschaftliches Personal

Anzahl der Stellen
1

Einsatzort
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM)

Bewerbung bis
05.09.19

Job description:
Scientific services in research within the project “Migration and the welfare state – migration models, fiscal effects, acceptance and institutional adaptability” with particular focus on the quantitative analyses of attitudes towards immigration and quantitatively informed analyses of migration discourses; quantitative data analysis; publication of research results in peer-reviewed international journals; presentation of results for expert audiences as well as broader public audiences; tasks pertaining to scientific qualification (PhD)

Requirements:
Completed academic education in Social Sciences or related fields (e. g. Economics, Sociology, Political Science, Psychology); well-grounded knowledge in Integration and Migration Research; further expertise in social policy research is an advantage; good working knowledge of quantitative methods and common statistical analysis software (e. g. Stata, R) or willingness to gain this expertise through further training; basic knowledge about quantitatively informed discourse analysis or media analysis is an advantage; practical research experience (e. g. about the analysis of cross-sectional or longitudinal survey data) are desired; excellent language skills in German or English

Bewerbung an
Please send your application, and quoting the reference number DR/140/19, to: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM), Dr. Tim Müller, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany or preferably by e-mail in a single PDF-file to t.mueller@hu-berlin.de. We are kindly asking to not send photographs with your CV.
HU is seeking to increase the proportion of women in research and teaching, and specifically encourages qualified female scholars to apply. Severely disabled applicants with equivalent qualifications will be given preferential consideration. People with an immigration background are specifically encouraged to apply. Since we will not return your documents, please submit copies in the application only.
Please visit our website www.hu-berlin.de/stellenangebote, which gives you access to the legally binding German version.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Research fellow
with presumably 2/3-part-time employment - E 13 TV-L HU (third party funding, fixed-term until 30.06.2022)


Kennziffer
DR/141/19

Kategorie(n)
Wissenschaftliches Personal

Anzahl der Stellen
1

Einsatzort
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM)

Bewerbung bis
05.09.19

Job description:
Scientific services in research within the project “Migration and the welfare state – migration models, fiscal effects, acceptance and institutional adaptability” with particular focus on the international comparisons of welfare state, integration and migration policy regimes; micro-level analyses of social and labour market indicators of integration; quantitative data analysis; publication of research results in peer-reviewed international journals; presentation of results for expert audiences as well as broader public audiences; tasks pertaining to scientific qualification (PhD)

Requirements:
Completed academic education in Social Sciences or related fields (e. g. Economics, Sociology, Political Science); well-grounded knowledge in Integration and Migration Research; further expertise in social policy research and methods of international comparative research are an advantage; advanced knowledge about widely used databases of social and economic indicators of integration; good working knowledge of quantitative methods and common statistical analysis software (e. g. Stata, R) or willingness to gain this expertise through further training; practical research experience (e. g. about the analysis of cross-sectional or longitudinal survey data) is desired; excellent language skills in German or English

Bewerbung an
Please send your application, and quoting the reference number DR/141/19, to: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM), Dr. Tim Müller, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany or preferably by e-mail in a single PDF-file to t.mueller@hu-berlin.de. We are kindly asking to not send photographs with your CV.
HU is seeking to increase the proportion of women in research and teaching, and specifically encourages qualified female scholars to apply. Severely disabled applicants with equivalent qualifications will be given preferential consideration. People with an immigration background are specifically encouraged to apply. Since we will not return your documents, please submit copies in the application only.
Please visit our website www.hu-berlin.de/stellenangebote, which gives you access to the legally binding German version.

 

04.04.2018

University Courses for Refugees in the Social Sciences

As a part of Humboldt University's initiative “Refugees as guest students”, the Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM) offers two classes for refugees and other interested students in the social sciences on migration, space, and gender. The seminars will be held in Arabic or Farsi as well as in English.

1) The main topics of the seminar "Places of Migration" are space, migration and urbanisation. Participants will focus on a community or a neighborhood as a place of migration in Berlin, and produce a map as their final assignment. The seminar will start on Wednesday, 18th of April, 4 - 6pm (Room H 3010, Main Building of Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin).

2) The seminar "Gendered Public Space" is designed as a block seminar from 14th of May to 17th of May, 10am - 6pm, to explore the range of gendered analysis of built environment. Gender, diversity and multiculturalism will be the central themes for understanding the relation between gender identity, the city of Berlin and its development. The seminar will take place at Invalidenstr. 110, 10115 Berlin, room 246.

Please come to the first session to register with the lecturers for the seminars.

The seminars were granted the prize “Menschen mit Hintergrund” by the University of Regensburg and the BAMF in 2016.

The seminars are acknowledged compulsory elective subjects (Überfachlicher Wahlpflichtbereich). Please register via Agnes:
Places of Migration
Gendered Public Spaces

If you have any questions on the classes, please contact kuehnern@cms.hu-berlin.de.
 

22.01.2018

Peacemakers Project has started with a kick-off meeting in Istanbul

The project "Peace Dialogue Campus Network: Fostering Positive Attitudes between Migrants and Youth in Hosting Societies" aims to foster a more peaceful generation in Europe and in Turkey that approaches migrants with positive attitudes to overcome prejudices, tackle discrimination and help social inclusion through intercultural communication. It will aim to achieve this objective via an international peace dialogue campus network of university students, led by 30 "Peace Envoys". They will be trained for 2 years in the Peacemakers project to develop their problem solving, critical thinking, collaborative working and conflict resolution skills through rigorous academic preparation, experiential education and leadership development. Both formal (online course) and non-formal (train-the-trainer camps) education methods will be used. The 30 Peace Envoys will be composed of 6 students from 5 partner universities (except Aberta, which is an open university that only offers online education). They will gather in 3 train-the-trainer camps in Istanbul, Florence, Rotterdam respectively. Each train-the-trainer camp will take place for 5 days. In these train-the-trainer camps, the Peace Envoys will be trained as trainers, who will be assigned, right after the Train-the-trainer Camp 1, with the task of training student groups and creating peace dialogue students’ clubs in their home universities, which will finally become a "Peace Dialogue Campus Network".
This program is led by Koc University in Istanbul, with a generous funding from Erasmus Plus. The project will last for 2 years and it will be completed in March 2020.

Partners: Erasmus University in Rotterdam (the Netherlands), Gaziantep University (Turkey), Universidade Aberta (Portugal), Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin (Germany), University of Bologna (Italy) and Koc University (Turkey)

Responsible Professor at Humboldt University: Prof. Gökce Yurdakul (Institut für Sozialwissenschaften, Diversity and Social Conflict, Berliner Institut für Integrations- und Migrationsforschung)

06.10.2017

Berlin in Dialogue: University Courses for Refugees in the Social Sciences

The Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration research (BIM) is active in supporting refugees in their access to university and to academic exchange and knowledge production. Every semester, BIM offers two university classes for refugees and other interested students in the social sciences on migration, space, and gender. The seminars will be held in Arabic or Farsi as well as in English.

Please come to the first session to register with the lecturers.
The current course description can be found here. The courses start on 18 or 23 October 2017.
Further information can be found here: Berlin in Dialogue

27.01.2017

New Website for the BIM-research cluster "Shifting Solidarities?"

More than 60 researchers work in 14 subprojects within the Research-Intervention-Cluster “Shifting Solidarities?” which was established in April 2016 at the BIM and is funded by the Federal Government’s Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration. Today a new website is going online that contains further information about the research cluster, its subprojects and the research process.
On the website www.bim-fluchtcluster.hu-berlin.de you will also find interviews with staff members, podcasts and recordings of events, beginning with an interview with BIM-director Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Kaschuba about the present developments in migration research and the tasks of the research cluster.

19.12.2016

Award "Menschen mit Hintergrund" for the BIM-Initiative "Berlin in Dialogue"

The BIM-initiative „Berlin in Dialogue“ has received the award “Menschen mit Hintergrund” from the University of Regensburg. The initiative was rewarded for its multilingual courses for refugees and other interested students in the social sciences, that were characterized as “forward-looking model for the interaction with young migrants” by the jury.

The press release is only accessible in German: „Preis für Menschen mit Hintergrund“ 2016

13.12.2016

BIM-Expertise in Cooperation with "Mediendienst Integration"

The BIM-project „Schooling recently migrated and refugee children in Berlin – Methods and Challenges” has published the press expertise “Inclusion with Segregation?”. The expertise was released in cooperation with the media service “Mediendienst Integration”.

The subproject is part of the research cluster “Shifting Solidarities?” which is funded by the Federal Government’s Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration.

The final results will be published by the end of March.

23.11.2016

Press Release: Study Opportunities for Refugees in Germany

Universities in Germany are involved with the integration of refugees and build bridges for their enrolment. This appears in the results of a survey conducted by the Berlin Institute for Migration and Integration Research (BIM), which were presented at a conference on November 23 in cooperation with the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung.

The survey was conducted in the context of the BIM-research cluster “Changing Solidarities?” and funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration. The subproject is led by Prof. Dr. Julia von Blumenthal and compiled by Steffen Beigang, Katja Wegmann and Valentin Feneberg. The final results will be published within the next year.

The press release is only accessible in German: BIM-PM Studienmöglichkeiten für Geflüchtete

Media contact: Dipl.-Pol. Damian Ghamlouche, 030/22015705, d.ghamlouche@hu-berlin.de

15.11.2016

New Research Project: Refugee Families in Germany (GeFam)

In a joint project, the IAB, the BAMF-FZ and the SOEP conduct a representative survey among refugees which arrived in Germany between January 1 and January 31, 2013. In this context the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) supports a duplication of the case numbers with another 1600 persons and their families, which will be interviewed between October and December 2016.

In an analysis project which is located at the BIM and the IAB the integration of refugees in the job market will be examined. The project focuses on the relevance of labor market policies and the influence of the changing statutory framework for the labor market access of refugees in Germany.

03.11.2016

New BIM-Fellow: Prof. Dr. Melissa Herman

Sociologist Melissa Herman studies adolescent development, focusing on multiracial youth and how their identities affect their development in areas such as achievement, mental health, and friendship choices.

She also studies perceptions of multiracial people and whether observers’ perceptions are congruent with multiracial people’s self-identifications. Another area of her research is on attitudes toward multiracial people, including whether multiracial people should be protected under affirmative action and anti-discrimination policies and comparing people’s global versus personal attitudes toward different types of interracial relationships.  Melissa has taught at Dartmouth College, Northwestern University, and the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Melissa holds a BA in Psychology and Sociology from Wesleyan University and PhD and MA in Sociology from Stanford University. 

While at the BIM, Melissa is part of the Department of Education and Integration.

02.11.2016

New BIM-Fellow: Elisa Santanta

Since November 2016 and for ten months Elisa Santana is a visiting scientist at the BIM. As a scholar of the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation, her research focuses on political reforms concerning refugees.

31.10.2016

New BIM-Fellow: Prof. Dr. Carolina Stefoni

Dr. Carolina Stefoni is a member of the Department of Sociology of the University Alberto Hurtado in Santiago de Chile. She was head of the Department between 2013 and 2016 and director of the Interdisciplinary programe for inmigration sudies (PRIEM). She has been doing research on south south migration in Latin America, specially focused on informal sector and the participation of migrants; intercultural education within multicultural contexts and on the formation of transnational places.

28.09.2016

University Courses for Refugees in the Social Sciences

As a part of Humboldt University's initiative "Refugees as guest students", the Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research (BIM) offers two classes for refugees and other interested students in the social sciences on migration, space, and gender.

The seminars will be held in Arabic or Farsi as well as in English.

Below, you find short course descriptions. Please come to the first session to register with the lecturers. If you have any questions on the classes, please contact laura.lambert@hu-berlin.de

The courses are supported by the Institute for Social Sciences and funded by the dean's office at KSBF (Kultur-, Sozial- und Bildungswissenschaftlichen Fakultät).

Please find further information here (in Arabic, Farsi, German and English):

General information
COURSE: The Other('s) City: Living in Berlin as a post-migrant city
COURSE: Gendered Public Space

23.09.2016

Publication of the Study "Post-migrant North Rhine-Westphalia"

The study "Post-migrant North Rhine-Westphalia" is another part of a nationwide compiled data set which is published gradually. The results reveal that most of the federal state's population is open and unbiased towards muslims.  About 70 percent think that muslims should be more accepted in Germany. Nevertheless there is still reservation when it comes to concrete religious and political issues.
The representative survey on the attitude of North Rhine-Westphalia's population towards muslims has been conducted by the research group JUNITED and was funded by Stiftung Mercator.

The study is only accessible in German: Nordrhein-Westfalen postmigrantisch

01.09.2016

Publication of the "DIW Wochenbericht": Integration of Refugees into the Labour Market

With regard to the so called "refugee crisis" of 2015, how can the integration of refugees in Germany be a success? A group of social and economic scientists of the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) and the Berlin Institute for Migration Research (BIM) took a look in the past to answer this question: Although they had troubles in the beginning, refugees coming to Germany between 1990 and 2010 were able to catch up with other migrants in terms of their language ability and on the job market.

The publication is only accessible in German: DIW Wochenbericht 35/2016

24.08.2016

"DIW Wochenbericht": Study on AfD-supporters

The "Alternative for Germany" (AfD) attracts mainly men, citizens of the newly-formed German states, persons with a low level of education, laborer, unemployed persons and young people under the age of 30. This shows a study based on the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) and now published in the "DIW Wochenbericht". Martin Kroh (DIW) and Karolina Fetz (BIM) found out that the profile of the AfD-supporters changed: Today there are more former non-voters, voters of extreme right-wing parties and former market-liberal and leftist voters among them.

The study is only accessible in German: DIW Wochenbericht 34/2016

11.08.2016

BIM-Press Briefing: Publication of the Study "Structures and Motives of Voluntary Work with Refugees" (EFA2)

BIM-Press Briefing: Publication of the Study

Today a BIM-press briefing took place on the occasion of the publication of "EFA2".
The heads of the study, Dr. Serhat Karakayali (BIM) and Dr. J. Olaf Kleist (IMIS, University of Osnabrück) presented the main results of the study as well as policy advices for practical politics and civil society.
The findings of "EFA1" together with the results of "EFA2" provide an insight into dynamics, developments and structural changes in the movement of voluntary work with refugees in Germany.

The study is only accessible in German: EFA2

04.08.2016

New BIM-Study: Coordination and Challenges of Voluntary Work with Refugees

Widely unnoticed by the public, volunteers work with refugees in cities and municipalities for several months now. They are the ones that experience in their everyday life what the public discourse is only speculating about. With their work volunteers show that integration works in both directions.

This study has been conducted on behalf of the Bertelsmann-Stiftung by Dr. Ulrike Hamann, Dr. Serhat Karakayali, Leif Jannis Höfler and Mira Wallis.
It is only accessible in German: BIM-Studie

02.07.2016

Policy Recommendations for the Support of Voluntary Work with Refugees

Who is voluntarily working with refugees? How can this work be supported by public institutions? How can volunteers focus their work on the core of their challenges? What can and should politics do?
On behalf of the Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung, Dr. Serhat Karakayali (BIM) addresses these questions in his recently publicated policy recommendations.

The recommendations are available online: Handlungsempfehlungen "Willkommensgesellschaft stärken"

28.06.2016

Press Conference in the Federal Chancellery: Post-migrant Germany III

Press Conference in the Federal Chancellery: Post-migrant Germany III

Today the BIM-study "Post-migrant Germany III - Migrants' Perspectives on German Identities - Attitudes of Persons with and without Migration Background on National Identity in Germany" was presented in the Federal Chancellery. Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan (BIM-Vice Director) and Dr. Coskun Canan (BIM-Research Scientist) presented the results which among other things relate to narrations, associations and emotions of people with migration background concerning their identification with Germany and being German.

The study was conducted on behalf of the Federal Government Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration and funded by Stiftung Mercator.

21.06.2016

New BIM-SVR Research Project

A new reserach project in cooperation with the Expert Council of German Foundations on Integration and Migration (SVR) will examine the influence of teachers' expactations on the performance of their students.

Further information in German: BIM-SVR Pressemitteilung

08.06.2016

"Changing Solidarities?" - New Research Cluster

Since 2012 the number of refugees worldwide is increasing constantly. 60 million people were affected by flight and expulsion only last year, about 2 million found their way to Europe. Even if the increase of the numbers of immigrants was thus predictable, a shift in social roles and solidarities took place – within the European society as well as the European nation states.
How does the frequently mentioned “welcoming cultures” develop within this context?  How do solidarity processes take place in times of a parallel diminishing of solidarities? What kind of people help in which contexts and what can motivate them?  How can institutional and logistical support be provided?
With the development of a research cluster the BIM reacts to this gap in research. The practical accompanying research within the cluster aims to produce concepts and policy recommendations for politics and civil society.
The research cluster is funded by the Federal Government Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration.The cluster is divided into three pillars and 14 subprojects.

A) "Welcoming Culture" and Solidarity in a Society of Immigration

Project 1: Shifting Solidarities in Europe. Migrants from Poland in Germany and Their Attitudes towards and Engagement for Refugees

Project 2: Diminishing Solidarities and Racism

Project 3: Subtle Prejudices

Project 4: Gender-specific Research on the Social Situation of Migrants on the Basis of SOEP

B) Volunteering and Civil Society

Project 5: Structures and Motives for the Voluntary Support of Refugees

Project 6: Work with Refugees in Sports Clubs

Project 7: Structural Changes of Voluntary Offices in Sports Clubs

Project 8: RefugeeHub. Online Platform for the Mediation between Supporters and Refugees

Project 9: Between Camp and Lease - Different housing conditions and their potential for integration. A study on the housing situation of refugee women

C) Institutions in the "Organizational Society"

Project 10: Strategies for a Dialogical Approach to Psychological Strains of Supporters

Project 11: Institutional Adaptability of Universities

Project 12: The Teaching of Refugee Children in Berlin - Experiences and Challenges

Project 13: Migration und Logistics

Project 14: Coordination of the Research Clusters (Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan/Sana Shah)

01.06.2016

Support for Threatened Academics at Humboldt University

From July 2016 on the Turkish sociologist Dr. Nil Mutluer is working as a scholar under the professorship of Prof. Dr. Gökce Yurdakul at the BIM. Her topic is "The Masculine Voice of Political Authority in Turkey: From Gezi to Sur". Nil Mutluer is one of two scholars who are able to continue their careers due to the HU's successful application at the Philipp Schwartz Initiative.
The Philipp Schwartz Initiative supports threatened scientists who have to interrupt their work on account of the current situation in their home countries.

19.04.2016

Presentation of First Results of the Study on "Experiences of Discrimination in Germany" at the Federal Press Conference

Presentation of First Results of the Study on

Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan (BIM-Vice Director) and Steffen Beigang together with Christine Lüders (Federal Anti-Discrimination Agency) have presented the first results of a representative study at the Federal Press Conference. According to these first findings, discrimination is widely spread in Germany. Further evaluations of the data will follow soon.

12.02.2016

Press Release: "Post-migrant Schleswig-Holstein"

The study "Post-migrant Schleswig Holstein" is another part of a nationwide compiled data set which is published gradually. The results reveal that most of the federal state's population show an abstract openness towards muslims. Nevertheless precise prejudices should not be underestimated.
The representative survey on the attitude of Schleswig Holstein's population towards muslims has been conducted by the research group JUNITED and was funded by Stiftung Mercator and the federal state of Schleswig Holstein.

The study is available in German: Schleswig Holstein postmigrantisch

25.01.2016

Dr. Ulrike Kluge Receives Max Rubner Award

Dr. Ulrike Kluge, member of the department "Migration, Mental and Physical Health and Health Research" and research associate at the Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité University Clinic Berlin, has received the Max Rubner Award for trailblazers at the Charité. The prize was awarded due to her development of a competence center for psychiatric and psychotherapeutic expertise in the work with refugees. Moreover the competence center builds a network between actors involved in the support of refugees and makes the professionalization of cultural and linguistic mediators possible.

15.12.2015

BIM-Press Release: Racist Arguments in the Politics

The BIM publishes a press release concerning racist arguments in the politics, which are currently openly defended again. The most recent example is Björn Höcke's reference to a so-called special strategy of reproducion of Africans, which according to him differs from those of Europeans. Björn Höcke is a politician from the "Alternative for Germany" (AfD).

In the press release Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Kaschuba (BIM-Director), Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan (BIM- Vice Director) als well as Prof. Dr. Andreas Heinz (Head of the BIM-Department "Migration, Mental and Physical Health and Health Research") comment this development critically.
The press release is availabe in German: BIM-Pressemitteilung

14.10.2015

BIM-Press Briefing: Publication of "Post-migrant Berlin"

BIM-Press Briefing: Publication of

The study "Post-migrant Berlin" is part of a nationwide compiled data set which is published gradually. The results reveal that most of Berlin's population is open and unbiased towards muslims. Nevertheless a part of the population simultaneously is prejudiced.
The representative survey on the attitude of Berlin's population towards muslims has been conducted by the research group JUNITED and was funded by Stiftung Mercator.

The study was presented by Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan, Dr. Coskun Canan and Steffen Beigang. The results were commented by Doris Nahawandi (Berlin Senat's Commissioner for Integration and Migration).

The study is availabe in German: Berlin postmigrantisch

10.06.2015

Presentation of the "Migrant Integration Policy Index" (MIPEX) at the Federal Press Conference

Presentation of the

20.02.2015

Job Opening BIM-Department "Labor Market, Migration, and Integration"

18.09.2014

International Summer School "Expanding the Margins: Migration, Mobilities, Border", September 21-26 2014

The programm is an interdisciplinary summer school for M.A. and Ph.D. students in the fields of European Ethnology, Social Sciences, Political Science, Human Geography, Philosophy and Gender Studies. 6 partner universities are involved. It is organized by 4 junior scientists at the Humboldt University in Berlin. The following members of the Berlin Institute for Integration and Migration Research take part in it: Sina Arnold, Dr. Manuela Bojadzijev, Dr. Serhat Karakayali , Dr. Birgit zur Nieden.

10.09.2014

Mainstreaming Sport Science in Germany - Interview with ICSSPE

Sebastian Braun is Professor for Sport Sociology at the Humboldt University Berlin (Germany) and has recently been appointed as Director of the newly founded Berlin Institute for Empirical Research on Integration and Migration (BIM). ICSSPE talked to him about his work and current projects as well as the interdisciplinary idea the BIM is based on.

http://www.icsspe.org/content/mainstreaming-sport-science-germany